Best Recurve Bow 2018 Review & Buyer’s Guide

When looking for the best recurve bow for the money, there is a lot of information – and misinformation regarding what exactly makes a great recurve bow. Luckily I am here to go through all the different details you could possibly need to consider when it comes to buying a recurve bow. We’ll consider the different types of materials used in the manufacturing process while considering some of the more affordable options and how they differ from the high-performance models. Either way, we’ll have you pulling the strings of the best recurve bow for you in no time!

When making any type of purchase online, it’s important to do the necessary research. There is nothing worse than spending your hard earned money on something that will fall apart only after a few hours of use. We’re here to avoid any disappointment and will only include reviews of the best recurve bows that have stood the test of time. No junk here!

The first thing you’re going to want to consider is what exactly you’ll be using the bow for. Are you going to be using it for hunting? Or maybe just target shooting in the backyard? Maybe you’re a modern day robin hood and need a recurve bow to protect the motherland! Whatever it is, it’s important to have an understanding of what you’ll be doing with your bow as it will help determine what exact type of bow you’ll be buying.

What is Draw Weight Right For You?

One of the important points to consider for your purchase is in direct relation to how advanced you are as an archer. For example, if you are not particularly strong or maybe don’t have too much experience with recurve bows, then you may want to consider buying a bow that has a lesser draw weight versions available. If you make the mistake of buying a bow with a heavy draw weight and you plan on using the bow for practice a lot or at the range, you’ll tire extremely quickly. If this is the case, I’d recommend a bow with a draw weight of 40 pounds or less.

However, if you already have some experience with recurve bows, have a good level of strength and will likely use your bow for hunting game, you then want to consider a model that offers a draw weight of 45 pounds or more. Again, if you’re a recreational archer, consider something light. Archery should be a fun and relaxing activity and if you are cringing with every shot, you’re not going to be having much fun.

Below, we’ve listed the draw weights that would be appropriate for anybody that might be considering buying a recurve bow.

Small Youth (55-100 lbs.) 10-15 lbs.
Larger Youth (100-130 lbs.) 10-20 lbs.
Small Frame Women (100-130 lbs.) 15-30 lbs.
Medium Frame Women (130-160 lbs.) 20-35 lbs.
Athletic Teens (130-150 lbs.) 25-45 lbs.
Small Frame Men (120-150 lbs.) 20-40 lbs.
Large Frame Women (160+ lbs.) 30-50 lbs.
Medium Frame Men (150-180 lbs.) 30-50 lbs.
Large Frame Men (180+ lbs.) 35-55 lbs

Recurve Bow Weight:- Similar to the draw weight, you want to consider the actual rate of the bow as well. Too heavy, you’ll be cursing the bow every time you have to use it or have to transport it somewhere. Too light, and it might not offer the force required to handle the variety of activities you’d like; particularly hunting. If you’re considering a recurve bow for hunting, make sure to do some extra research as there are a variety of factors you NEED to have right before hunting any game. It’s both illegal and morally wrong to hunt animals if you’re weapon doesn’t offer the power to kill an animal humanely.

Durability of Recurve Bows:- You work hard for your money, you want to make sure that whatever recurve bow you buy, that it’s made of high-quality materials. In most cases, you want to only consider bows made of fiberglass as they’ll generally be lighter and will be extremely durable. There are a variety of pieces that make up the bow and you’ll want to ensure that they are of high quality. We’ve done the sorting for you and rest assured, if you buy from our list, anything you buy will be decent quality at the very best. Do remember, that much like anything, you get what you pay for and recurve bows are no different.

Some of the Best Recurve Bow Reviews

Samick Sage Takedown Recurve Bow

Best Recurve Bow reviews

Known for designing some of the highest quality bows and bow related products, Samick Sage is a favorite of ours when it comes to the best recurve bows for the money on the market. The 62” bow includes a B-50 bowstring and arrow rest along with a pre-installed brass brushings that can be upgraded for a brass plunger, stabilizer, sight, and quiver.

Fantastic for the beginner because it’s relatively inexpensive the design as well is perfect for those new to the sport and are working to build their stance and develop the basics of shooting. Retailing somewhere around the $150 mark, the bow will further retain its value because of the removable limbs that be sorted out as the shooter becomes more experience and/or stronger.

When ordering online, you can choose the draw weight from 25lbs to 60lbs and either a right-handed orientation or left.

What others are saying about the Samick Sage Takedown Recurve Bow

“As someone who is new to archery, I found the Samick Sage Takedown Recurve Bow to be the perfect option for me. Not only is it light and easy to use, but I also found the performance to be really great. To be honest, I chose this bow because of the price but the quality actually blew me away as well. Not only it does it last, but the pull is clean and it fires smoothly pretty much everytime”

Martin Jaguar Takedown Recurve Bow

 recurve bow for sale

One of the more recognizable brands in archery, the Martin Saber is slightly longer than the Samick Sage offering at 64” and is also heavier than the Samick Sage as well. A little more expensive as well, the Martin Jaguar is definitely a more robust bow. This particular model only is available to right-handers and comes in either a 40lb or 50lb draw weight.

It comes apart for simple storage and is very easy to put together no matter what condition you’re in. Performance wise, the Martin Jaguar is a fantastic bow for the money. Consistent among archery competitors, it’s a fantastic recurve bow for the money.

What others are saying about the Martin Jaguar Takedown Recurve Bow:

“The Martin Jaguar is a beautiful bow. At 64” it’s the perfect size for me (6 foot 2 inches) and it shoots really well. Highly recommended.”

PSE Razorback Recurve Bow Review

bear recurve bow

One of the easier recurve bows to take apart, the limbs connect to the riser with one large screw on each end and does not require a screwdriver to take apart or put together. A huge plus!

It’s also an extremely affordable recurve bow. You can find it on sale from Amazon for often times less than $100 which makes it ideal for beginner bow users. Also, it doesn’t matter if you’re left or right handed as the interchangeable limbs make it really easy to switch. You have a few different draw-weights to choose from but since I recommend this bow for a beginner, I also recommend a low draw-weight to match.

One thing to be aware of is that this bow only comes with the recurve bow and string. You’ll still need to buy a bow stringer, arrows and a target (if necessary).

What others are saying about the PSE Razorback Recurve Bow:

“I absolutely love how versatile this bow is. It’s so easy to take apart and even easier to put back together. I travel a lot for hunting and it’s a fantastic recreational recurve bow to take with me.”

SAS Spirit 62” Take Down Recurve Bow

olympic recurve bow

The SAS Spirit Recurve bow is a beautifully sculpted bow with a handle that feels perfect. Another great value bow, you can again often find this bow for less than $100 from Amazon. Typically the price point will also indicate who the SAS Take Down Bow is made for – you guessed it! Beginners!

The draw is tremendously smooth and the release is clean. Like I said – great for beginners. You have a variety of sizes to choose from but be careful and remember that one size definitely doesn’t fit all. Remember to check our sizing chart above to choose the right bow size for you. In the case of the Take-Down Recurve Bow options include 22lb, 26lb, 30lb, and 34lb.

I have had some issues with customer service from SAS. I would be cautious on this front as it’s one of those things of ‘you get what you pay for’!

What others are saying about the SAS Spirit 62” Take Down Recurve Bow:

Awesome bow for the price! I got the 25lb draw weight version for my 11-year-old daughter and she absolutely loves it. Very well made and transportable. I’m thinking of getting another one for my son next year who is extremely jealous of his big sister”

OMP Explore 2.0 Recurve Bow

traditional recurve bow

An extremely versatile intermediate level recurve bow, the Explorer 2.0 is a popular bow among my customers. Crafted from hand-selected Oak, Walnut and Hard Maple, the construction of the bow is immaculate. I honestly can’t say enough about how gorgeous this bow is.

It offers a convenient 3 piece take-down design which allows for easy assembly and storage during the off-season. Also, I really like how transportable this bow is. I am someone who likes to go camping a lot and you know as well as I do how difficult it is to pack a car when going camping! It’s almost like you always have JUST enough room. With the Explorer 2.0, it’s not like you need to clear our 6 feet of space to make room.

The performance of this bow is also really impressive. I personally have the 35lb bow and it sure packs a punch. I haven’t used it for hunting but I’m able to slam a target from a pretty great distance away. I absolutely love it. Do yourself a favor though and buy a stringer and a shooting glove with this bow. It will help.

What others are saying about the OMP Explorer 2.0 Recurve Bow:

“A recurve bow which is perfect for the whole family. Definitely worth the money. Beautifully crafted from hardwood of maple, oak, and walnut I can tell it’s going to last for a long time to come.

Other things to consider when purchasing a recurve bow

Recurve Bow Accessories:- When buying a recurve bow, many of the bows that you’ll see will require accessories to make them perform to the best of their ability. It’s important to know which accessories you’ll need and I encourage you to check out our extensive guide to the best recurve bow accessories. In the meantime, let’s touch on a few of the must-haves.

Bow Stabilizers:- The stabilizers main function is to eliminate noise and low vibrations. Stabilizers come in all different shapes and sizes and although all stabilizers screw into the bow some versions employ a more sophisticated anatomy. They are easy to install and are great to add to some of the more powerful bows as it makes it much easier to shoot, especially if you plan to shoot over and over again with your bow.

Bow Stringer:- A bow stringer is a must have for anyone who picks up a recurve bow. It’s ultimately the only way to safely and consistently string a bow. It allows you to safely use your body weight to bend the recurve bow and slide the string over the tips of the bow limbs. There is a more manual version that you can also use known as the ‘step-through’ method but it’s dangerous and not recommended for your recurve bow.

Recurve Arrows:- What’s a bow without arrows! Arrows are the next thing on the list (although perhaps first) you should pick up with your bow. Purchase more than one as there is nothing more frustrating than shooting your arrow and immediately having to go and retrieve it. You can get arrows from many sporting goods store or you can check out our guide has some great links to arrows you can buy on Amazon. Make sure to get arrows that are the right size for you or else you’ll be struggling to shoot with power and accuracy.

Nocking Points:- The main purpose of the nock point is to provide consistency with your shot. It also helps to make sure you don’t nick your hand with the arrow’s fletchings. In some cases, your bow will actually come with a nocking point but not in all cases. Double check to ensure.

Targets:- Similar to the arrows, what’s a great recurve bow without a target. You’ll need something to aim at so you might as well pick up some of the best arrow targets available. Targets are a necessity and can be both basic or fancy. I remember the one time I forgot to pick up targets and I made my own out of cardboard and markers. It got worn out pretty good. It’s worth spending the few bucks on a target that will be built to last.

Arm Guard:- An arm guard is great for protecting your forearm and sometimes your entire arm. It’s great for beginners who are learning the proper technique as scraping your arms is common. As you pull the string back, learn to adjust your elbow vertically to keep most of your arm out of way from the string. This will eventually allow you to get away from the arm guard but is a necessity when you’re first practicing with your new recurve bow.

Arrow Rest:- If you bow doesn’t come with an arrow rest, you’ll want to get one right away. The arrow rest is what the arrow sets on as it is drawn, and can come in a couple of different styles. There is the basic version which is simply fixed rest but more a more complicated drop-away rest that falls out of the way as the arrow is released. If you’re new to archery a simple arrow rest will do the trick.

Bow String Wax:- For keeping that bow string lubricated you’ll want some bow string wax. When you take a really close at a string, you’ll notice it’s made up of millions of fibers that make up one long strand of string. If not properly taken care of, the string will begin to fray and you’ll end up being in the market for a new bowstring. Bowstring wax will also help protect against the elements including water and other elements you might encounter in the outdoors. Ensure you buy high-quality bowstring wax and apply every 2-4 weeks.

We will be happy to see your thoughts

Leave a reply

Search